Session Details for the Editors' Association of Canada/Association Canadienne des Réviseurs: Conference 2006 - Congrès 2006 - Vancouver

Session Details for Conference 2006

Please see the main Program and Sessions page for an overview.

Pre-Conference Workshops | Saturday | Sunday

Pre-Conference Workshops

Please see the EAC-BC Workshops page for information.

Saturday Sessions

All sessions take place at SFU Vancouver, in the Harbour Centre building, 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC.

Keynote Address: Credit Where It Is Due – Wayson Choy

Saturday, June 10, 2006
9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Award-winning author Wayson Choy will reveal the creative and intimate personal relationships between himself and his editors that make his books as successful as they are. He credits his editors for pointing the way through the seemingly amorphous masses of material he collects and writes, mostly through regular meetings over long periods of time—and through two near-death experiences.

Editors as Champions of Literacy

Saturday, June 10, 2006
10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

A small business can make a big difference. Learn how you can take up the challenge of corporate social responsibility and turn it into a viable marketing strategy. Veronica Schami briefly discusses marketing strategies she has used and describes in detail how her company is working toward making a positive impact on literacy in the community. She will share a simple formula that individuals and small businesses can adapt for their own purposes. For general information about this project, visit www.veronicaschami.com and click on the link for "Readers for Life."

Veronica Schami founded the award-winning Veronica Schami Editorial Services in 1997 and has since built a team of editors and translators who specialize in commercial publications and corporate and marketing communications in the private, public, and non-profit sectors. For more information, visit www.veronicaschami.com.

Editing English for Translation: How you can be worth your weight in gold

Saturday, June 10, 2006
10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Thanks to thriving international business, what you write or edit will often need to be translated into other languages. Are you torturing your translators with difficult-to-translate constructions? Or are you supporting them with translatable source text? In this session we will explore various aspects of translatability, including the use of syntactic cues. We will analyze common English language constructions that pose problems for translators and propose appropriate solutions. Editors will gain new insights and a practical set of tools and strategies to help them improve the translatability of their source documentation.

Leif Sonstenes, BMath, has been active in global business for more than 20 years in Europe and North America as a translator, editor, and translation business owner, and as a global account manager for major localization companies. Winner of numerous corporate and customer service awards, he specializes in creating intense learning experiences where participants gain real tools to tackle real issues. His areas of expertise include translatability training, content development, and international language consulting.

Tongue-Tied: The role of editors in an image-driven world

Saturday, June 10, 2006
1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

In today’s fast-paced and changing world, people’s reading habits are changing, requiring editors to adjust their presentation of information to satisfy shorter reading time and attention spans. Images are playing more of a role than ever in magazines, corporate reports, websites, and more. What are the challenges in dealing with images and how are our jobs as editors changing to accommodate the growing requirement for images?

Mel-Lynda Andersen has close to two decades of experience editing and proofreading a variety of consumer, trade, and special-interest publications. She also has experience writing and editing advertising and promotional copy, developing content for brochures, newsletters, display ads, and websites, and providing production management services for publications and newsletters.

Editing in Isolation: How to cope when you're the only one at the water cooler

Saturday, June 10, 2006
1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

A sense of isolation can pervade a freelancer's working days, leading to frustration and anxiety. In-house editors can also feel isolated, especially when they're the only one focused on "getting it right." This session examines strategies for professional editors who want to get and stay connected—to their peers, to their clients, and to the wider world of business. Such strategies can open doors to business and professional development opportunities. Freelance editors belong to a growing number of "free agents" and need to know that they are not alone. The benefits of isolation—for the work that editors do—will also be highlighted.

Naomi Pauls is not a famous person, and that's just the way she likes it. Since her first career as a community museum curator, she prefers to work behind the scenes. That said, she is not a recluse. Her first editing job was at the Vancouver alternative weekly the Georgia Straight. She has been a freelance editor since 1997. Her clients—including corporations, authors, and publishers—know her as a dedicated wordsmith who helps them fine-tune their communications. Naomi holds a Bachelor of Arts in anthropology and a Master of Publishing degree. In 2005 she set up a small office in downtown Vancouver.

How to Retire Gracefully (and Sanely)

Saturday, June 10, 2006
1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Back by popular demand. This discussion session is an opportunity to start thinking about retirement, a life-changing event that merits serious forethought. The discussion will concentrate on the emotional and human-relations sides of challenges such as exit strategies and retirement living. Panelists will tell their own stories, encourage participants to tell theirs, and stimulate sharing of problems and solutions.

When Lee d'Anjou began freelance editing in 1970, she had one client, a few #2 pencils, some paste-on query slips, a dog-earred MLA stylesheet, and a steel pica rule. By Christmas 2003, after several hundred manuscripts and authors, she was ready to retire. By June 2005, she had almost succeeded in clearing out her office and convincing her clients to call other editors. But she still cherishes her pica rule.

Greg Ioannou, the president of Colborne Communications, began freelance writing and editing upon graduation from UBC in 1977 and has never had a "real" job. Greg has edited over 2,000 books, as well as magazines, booklets, brochures, government reports, and websites. He's trying to work out how to retire without anyone noticing.

Over 34 years, Peter Moskos has been a university lecturer, a high school teacher, an educational consultant (writing), a writing instructor, a freelance writer and editor, and a partner in an Ottawa communications company (gordongroup). Peter has retired from gordongroup and is now based in Vancouver, where he continues writing, editing, and training.

An Appreciation of English: A language in motion

Saturday, June 10, 2006
2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Language changes. The English of today is very different from the English of Beowulf, and it's still changing—a language that doesn't change is dead. And yet our job as editors is often seen as focused on resisting change. Certainly many usages that drive us crazy are recent changes; others, however, are not. And many "good old" usages that "purists" cling to were themselves introduced as changes. We can't avoid embracing change, though we can choose which changes to embrace. So which changes should we embrace?

James Harbeck is an editor, designer, writer, web developer, language maven, and student of linguistics. He has been fascinated with language since he was old enough to use it; he has references on more than three dozen languages on his bookshelf, and is known for his love of wordplay. He has a PhD in theatre, sings in the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir and often in conversation, runs, skis, and cooks.

EAC Town Hall Meeting: How to win friends and influence editors

Saturday, June 10, 2006
2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Why maintain a membership in EAC? The website lists a range of benefits and services that "the association" offers, but who's really doing the offering? EAC is neither more nor less than the sum of its members' energy, vision, and commitment. It exists to enable editors to help one another and further the interests of the profession. Find out how you can make your mark in EAC, make career contacts and fast friendships, and make the most of your membership dollar along the way.

The Art of Mentoring

Saturday, June 10, 2006
2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Mentor was the loyal friend and wise advisor to Odysseus and the guardian and tutor to his son Telemachus. Mentor's responsibilities included both moral education and the passing on of wisdom. The art of mentoring goes far beyond the passing on of technical know-how and involves a relationship of trust and sympathetic intellect. This session examines the conditions under which such a relationship can flourish and the role mentors play in the profession, and is based on a research project which compared face-to-face and online mentoring for writers and editors, both in Canada and the UK.

Ann Cowan joined SFU as the director of program information in Continuing Studies in 1977. Ann founded the Writing and Publishing Program, which in the early days included the Reader's Book Club co-sponsored with Duthie Books. Out of that program grew the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing, which now has a notable master's program, summer workshops, and important research centre, directed by Professor Rowland Lorimer. As co-director, she conducted a study of online mentoring as a training strategy in the development of writers and editors. Her degrees are from the University of Toronto and Carleton University and she is also a by-fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge.

Annual General Meeting (EAC members only)

Saturday, June 10, 2006
4:15 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.

Sunday Sessions

All sessions take place at SFU Vancouver, in the Harbour Centre building, 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC.

How Far Do You Go: Defining the level of edit

Sunday, June 11, 2006
9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Your project has been classed as stylistic editing—that grey area between the shaping of substantive editing and the arbitrary copy editing. How do you decide how much editing to do at the paragraph and line level? How much rewriting to do? And what should your guidelines be?

Faith Gildenhuys, past president of EAC, is a freelance editor and writer of a wide variety of documents, including public sector procedures manuals and web-based materials, as well as academic papers, educational materials, trade books, and personal memoirs. Faith enjoys the challenge of structural and substantive editing of materials on almost any topic.

Subcontracting 101

Sunday, June 11, 2006
9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Subcontracting is a sure-fire way to fortify your business against the feast or famine cycle of freelancing. Subcontracting work to trusted associates gives you the freedom to:

  • take on new clients without sacrificing current clients
  • achieve a steady flow of income
  • build up a network of contacts for referring and gaining work

This session will teach participants how to:

  • conquer fears of subcontracting
  • identify the best types of work for contracting
  • train and manage subcontractors
  • ensure quality control of the finished manuscript
  • decide when to subcontract and when to refer

Elizabeth Cockle is Senior Strategic Writer at McCarthy Tétrault LLP. She also runs EC Writing, providing writing and editing services to an international mix of corporations, publishers, and non-profit organizations. Elizabeth began subcontracting projects after her first year in business. She attributes much of her success to a willingness to subcontract.

The Mysteries of Mediation

Sunday, June 11, 2006
9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Mediation has long been one of the services that EAC offers its members. Yet many members know little about the mediator and how she can help them. Three former EAC mediators, Janis Barr, Joan Irving, and Peter Moskos, will show you what the mediator does and will challenge your judgment by having you solve some of the tricky problems that the mediator has to deal with. They’ll also provide advice that will help you avoid having to use the mediator’s services. They look forward to having you describe some of the difficult business situations you’ve had to deal with.

Janis Barr began her editing career in 1986. She works mainly for educational publishing companies as a developmental editor for textbooks and teacher’s guides in all subject areas and grade levels. She has served as chair of the British Columbia branch of EAC and as mediator. She is a member of West Coast Editorial Associates.

Joan Irving is an editor and French-to-English translator who specializes in film and TV work. She has written the subtitles for numerous feature and documentary films, including Les Invasions barbares. Her translation of Récits de Mathieu Mestokosho, chasseur innu (Caribou Hunter: A Song of a Vanished Innu Life) was published this spring by Greystone Books.

Peter Moskos has played numerous roles in EAC, both locally and nationally. Nationally, he served as the co-chair of the Certification Steering Committee. Currently, he sits on EAC’s national executive council as member-at-large. His first role at the national level was as mediator, in 1999-2000. As a partner in an Ottawa communications company, gordongroup, Peter dealt with a number of difficult contracts.

Copyright Issues in the 21st Century

Sunday, June 11, 2006
10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

This panel discussion will be made up of a member of Access Copyright, a professor in copyright law, and an editor of a monthly publication. The panel's purpose is to encourage discussion and debate on the topic of digital and moral rights, specifically pertaining to the question of whether it is possible to honour and respect creators' rights to their work while maximizing access to information.

Barbara K. Adamski is a writer and editor based in New Westminster, BC. Her work appears in several magazines and trade publications, including Flavours, enRoute, and The Walrus, and has been broadcast on CBC Radio. Barb has edited guidebooks for Tourism BC, teen sexual-health manuals for Vancouver Coastal Health, web copy for various corporations, and many feature-length articles. She is currently working on a series of language-arts manuals for elementary-school teachers. Barb can be reached through her website at www.barbadamski.com.

Researcher, writer, photographer, page-designer, reporter, editor: Ian Hanington has covered a lot of ground in print journalism. He has worked in various capacities for a variety of newspapers and magazines, from small-town community papers to Canada's largest alternative weekly. During his 11 years at the Georgia Straight, he worked his way from editorial assistant to assistant editor, managing editor, and finally editor. (He was also travel-section editor.) He has written about subjects ranging from politics to music, and just about everything in between. Until recently he worked as editor of Shared Vision, a monthly magazine devoted to issues of sustainability, health, and the politics of food.

Brian O'Donnell is employed as the director of business development at Access Copyright. He was a member of the board of Access Copyright for three years prior to joining the staff. Brian brings over 25 years of educational publishing experience to his position at Access Copyright. He was president and CEO of Irwin Publishing from 1998 to 2002 and worked for both Addison-Wesley and Copp Clark prior to joining Irwin Publishing. Brian has had extensive experience working in various capacitites with the ACP, CPC, and CERC. He is also an instructor in the publishing program at Ryerson University.

Mira Sundara Rajan holds the Canada Research Chair in Intellectual Property Law at the University of British Columbia. She obtained her doctorate writing on Copyright Law from the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre at St Peter's College, Oxford University, and her book, Copyright and Creative Freedom, will be appearing with Routledge in May. Mira has published and consulted throughout the UK and Europe, India, and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States, on areas spanning international trade, digital issues, and law reform in post-socialist and developing countries. As Canada Research Chair, she aims to establish an interdisciplinary Centre for the study of art and the law, the first of its kind in Canada.

Internships: Opportunity or opportunism?

Sunday, June 11, 2006
10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Some people see internships as the ideal way to get their foot in the door of the competitive world of publishing; others see them as exploitation. What are the arguments for and against internships?

Rowland Lorimer is founding director of the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing at Simon Fraser University. He is professor of communication, a former editor and publisher of the Canadian Journal of Communication (print and online), and a past president of the Canadian Association of Learned Journals. His research spans book, magazine, and journal publishing as well as mass communication with an emphasis on technology and policy.

Elizabeth Rains teaches writing and editing at Langara College and Capilano College. She is the publisher of Pacific Rim Magazine. Her company, Red Zebra Publishing and Marketing Inc., develops business plans and marketing materials.

Elizabeth has been editor of B.C. Grocer Magazine and Arts Access Magazine, and managing editor of The Capilano Review. She was a reporter for the Kamloops Daily News and the Vancouver Sun. She has had more than 1,000 articles published in newspapers and magazines in Canada, the U.S., and Ireland. She is the author of the Vancouver Parents Survival Guide, published by Brighouse Press.

Senior Editors' Roundtable (pre-registration required)

Sunday, June 11, 2006
10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Compare editorial ideas with experienced colleagues and tease out the tricks of a substantive edit in this group workshop. This session is for editors with a minimum of 10 years' experience. Limit of 15 participants. Participants must pre-register and will be asked to review a designated text and bring their comments with them to the session for discussion.

Ann-Marie Metten (facilitator) has edited a range of fiction and non-fiction since 1982. Recent work includes developing book projects with new and established authors, as well as substantive editing and copy editing of articles for alive magazine. Ann-Marie chaired the BC branch of the Editors' Association of Canada from 2000 to 2002. She currently sits on the board of the West Coast Book Prize Society, BC Books for Kids Society, and the Joy Kogawa House Society.

Closing Plenary: Ethics for editors

Sunday, June 11, 2006
1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

In this session, panelists will tackle such questions as:

  • What's true? Drawing the line (or not) between fiction and non-fiction.
  • Who gets to write? Voice, entitlement, appropriation.
  • Whose story is it? Invasion of privacy in memoir and life writing.
  • What's offensive? The isms (racism, sexism, classism, ageism, sizeism), and sex, profanity, and violence.
  • Who calls the shots? Responsibility to sponsors/advertisers vs. editorial autonomy.
  • Who decides what is appropriate or inappropriate for educational or children's books? The editor as potential censor.
  • What should the editor do when there is a conflict between what the publisher wants and what the author wants? The editor in the middle.

Nancy Flight is associate publisher of Greystone Books, a division of Douglas & McIntyre. She has been editing books for more than 30 years, both as an in-house editor and as a freelancer, in both Canada and the United States. She has worked with such authors as David Suzuki, Evelyn Lau, Wade Davis, Wayne Grady, Paul Quarrington, Bill McKibben, Harry Thurston, and Rick Bass, and was the recipient of the 1988 Tom Fairley Award for Editorial Excellence. In addition to her editorial work, she has taught at Banff and Simon Fraser University. She is past president of EAC and is currently president of the Association of Book Publishers of BC.

Researcher, writer, photographer, page-designer, reporter, editor: Ian Hanington has covered a lot of ground in print journalism. He has worked in various capacities for a variety of newspapers and magazines, from small-town community papers to Canada's largest alternative weekly. During his 11 years at the Georgia Straight, he worked his way from editorial assistant to assistant editor, managing editor, and finally editor. (He was also travel-section editor.) He has written about subjects ranging from politics to music, and just about everything in between. Until recently he worked as editor of Shared Vision, a monthly magazine devoted to issues of sustainability, health, and the politics of food.

Mary Schendlinger is an editor and writer who has worked in book and periodical publishing since 1972. She was managing editor at Harbour Publishing for ten years, and she has edited non-fiction books for Arsenal Pulp Press, Douglas & McIntyre, Greystone Books, Raincoast Books, Talon Books, Heritage House Publishing, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and others. She is also co-founder and senior editor of Geist magazine, and she has served on arts juries, led workshops at writers' conferences and festivals, and designed and taught courses in publishing for Simon Fraser University.

Yvonne Van Ruskenveld began her career in freelance editing in 1987, after 14 years in the federal government as a program coordinator and policy analyst. Her clients have included trade and educational publishers, governments, universities, and non-profit organizations. She has edited everything from promotional brochures to books, and was a founding member of West Coast Editorial Associates. In 2005, Yvonne became managing editor of Edvantage Press Limited, a BC-based company specializing in print and online educational resources.