Say Hello to Editors Canada

We’re transitioning to the Editors Canada brand. Over the next few months you’ll find our new look and messaging taking shape in our national and regional literature, emails and social media presence. Later this year we’ll be launching a fresh new website. Learn more about this exciting project.

Editors' Association of Canada

EAC-BC Professional Development Seminars

2015–2016 EAC-BC Seminars

Cancellation policy: If EAC-BC cancels a seminar, we will fully refund registration fees. If a registrant wants to cancel, the following terms apply:

  • Cancellations are accepted until registration closes on the Friday one week before the seminar.
  • We will charge a 50 percent fee for cancellations received before registration closes.
  • No refunds are given for cancellations received after registration has closed.  
  • Cancellations must be made by sending email to bccoordinator@editors.ca. 

For more information about the seminar content and/or speaker, contact bcseminars@editors.ca.                 

For registration enquiries, contact bccoordinator@editors.ca.

Interested in what's happening across the country? Check out the new EAC seminars page, where you can search the seminar offerings by province and plan your training adventures! 

Upcoming Seminars

Four Amazing Pre-conference Seminars—Register Here

Friday, June 10, 2016
Coast Plaza Hotel & Suites, 1763 Comox Street, Vancouver

Take advantage of Editors British Columbia’s pre-conference seminars on June 10, as we lead up to Editors Canada’s national conference in Vancouver, June 11-12! The local branch is offering three half-day seminars and its annual PubPro unconference:

  • PubPro 2016: Fourth Annual Unconference for Managing Editors and Publication Production Professionals
  • The Basics of Editing on PDF
  • Creating a House Style: A Simple Tool for Producing Better Documents Faster
  • Design and Prepress Basics for Editors

Visit the conference website for full details on each seminar and to register.

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Past Seminars 2015–2016

Plain Language: The Basics with Peter Moskos Presented in Victoria, in a partnership between Editors British Columbia and the Professional Editors Association of Vancouver Island (PEAVI). According to the Canadian Literacy and Learning Network, 42 percent of adult Canadians have difficulty reading the texts necessary to their daily lives (www.literacy.ca/literacy/literacy-sub). For many of these people, as well as those of us with little time to read documents more than once, plain language is a must. This course introduces plain language with participants working in groups and learning by doing. The course manual (included in the registration fee) demonstrates basic plain language techniques and provides “before” and “after” examples, practical exercises, and an easy-to-use checklist. An accomplished writer and editor, Peter Moskos specializes in plain language writing—organizing unstructured, complex, or overwritten materials and making them clear and easy to follow. Peter has written and edited reports to Parliament, technical reports, manuals, student handbooks, training materials, speeches, legislation, marketing materials, and advertising brochures. Now based in Vancouver, Peter is retired but continues to offer courses in plain language and in how to build a writing and editing business. In the past, Peter taught in Douglas College’s Print Futures Program and was an online instructor for Ryerson University’s Diploma in Publishing. Peter played a formative role in the development of Editors Canada’s certification program and for his contribution was designated an honorary Certified Professional Editor.

Tips and Tools for Self-Publishing and Small Presses with Eve Rickert and Franklin Veaux Editors BC’s April workshop will cover a range of options and activities available for self-publishing authors and indie presses, from production, printing, and distribution to e-book and audiobook production to publicity, advertising, and sales. In this five-hour workshop, participants will run through the entire book-publishing process from the perspective of a small publisher or self-publishing author. Lecture blocks will be broken up by Q&A sessions and group discussions. Freelance and in-house editors who work with small presses and self-publishing authors will find that this workshop adds value to the services they provide their clients. Eve Rickert is founder and senior writer/editor for Talk Science to Me Communications Inc. and managing editor for Thorntree Press. She is an Editors Canada Certified Professional Editor and has been involved in editing and production for print since 2002. Franklin Veaux is senior designer and prepress specialist for Talk Science to Me Communications Inc. and design director for Thorntree Press. He has provided professional prepress and, later, design services since 1992 for large clients all over the world.

The Art of the Query with Ruth Wilson Good querying skills are as important as any other copy editing function. Effective queries set the tone for a fruitful author-editor relationship and make the editing process more efficient. Poor querying can take a project off the rails. In this three-hour workshop, participants will review both effective and ineffective queries from actual manuscripts. They will have the opportunity to discuss process and procedure, and practise their querying skills in short exercises. Beginning and mid-career level editors will find this workshop most useful, though editors of all experience are welcome. Ruth Wilson has more than 30 years’ experience as an editor. She worked for many years with Vancouver, B.C., book publisher Self-Counsel Press, and since 1998 she has been a partner in West Coast Editorial Associates, offering a wide range of editorial and training services. Ruth is also a respected instructor at Simon Fraser University, where she has taught many courses in editorial skills for more than 15 years. In 2011 she was honoured as a recipient of the President’s Award for Volunteer Service from Editors Canada, and in 2014 she was recognized as a Certified Professional Editor (Hon) for the work she did in developing and launching Editors Canada’s world-class Certification Program.

Introduction to Applying Proofreading Markup to PDFs Using Adobe Acrobat Reader with Barbara Tomlin This 3-hour workshop introduces participants to the markup tools available in Adobe Acrobat Reader. Although Microsoft Word Track Changes is good for communicating at the document drafting and editing stage, Adobe Acrobat tools are better for the proofreading stage. Learning how to use Reader to annotate Portable Document Format (PDF) files can allow for more effective communication with co-workers: commenting tools can be used to add concise instructions and suggestions for revising content, while proofreading stamps can be used to show where detailed typographic changes are needed. Anyone doing work that requires collaborating with others to review and revise documents will want to learn how to make good use of commenting tools and proofreading stamps. Participants will use their own PC laptops during the workshop and should be familiar with basic file management techniques. They should know how to open, save, and close files in Adobe Acrobat Reader DC, a free download available at https://get.adobe.com/reader. Before the session, a workshop booklet file and a set of proofreading stamps will be provided to registered participants for loading on their laptops. The workshop is designed for PC users not Mac users. Barbara Tomlin began working in the publishing industry more than 35 years ago, first for educational and trade book publishers, and later for magazine publishers. Since then she has edited, copy edited, and proofread a wide range of material for a variety of clients. She is certified as an Editor in the Life Sciences and is a past chair of the Editors’ Association of Canada Certification Steering Committee. She has developed writing and editing workshops for many organizations, and was an instructor for SFU’s Marketing and Communications Program for 27 years. She is a founding partner of West Coast Editorial Associates.

Plain Language: The Basics with Peter Moskos According to the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), 48 percent of adult Canadians have difficulty reading the texts necessary to their daily lives. For many of these people, as well as those of us with little time to read documents more than once, plain language is a must. This course introduces plain language. The course manual demonstrates basic plain language techniques and provides “before” and “after” examples, practical exercises and an easy-to-use checklist. The course is learner-centred and skills-based. Working in groups, you will learn by doing. An accomplished writer and editor, Peter Moskos specializes in plain language writing—organizing unstructured, complex or overwritten materials and making them clear and easy to follow. Peter has written and edited reports to Parliament, technical reports, manuals, student handbooks, training materials, speeches, legislation, marketing materials and advertising brochures. Now based in Vancouver, Peter is retired but continues to offer courses in plain language and in how to build a writing and editing business. In the past, Peter taught in Douglas College’s Print Futures Program and was an online instructor for Ryerson University’s Diploma in Publishing. Peter played a formative role in the development of Editors Canada’s certification program and for his contribution was designated an honorary Certified Professional Editor.

Editing Fiction with Caroline Adderson Behind every great novelist and short story writer there is a great editor. In this course, acclaimed author and writing teacher Caroline Adderson will share techniques to help editors bring out the greatness in their writers, from dazzling openings to moving endings and the whole story in between. Participants will practise these techniques in-class (manuscripts provided). Adderson will also offer advice on the all-important writer-editor relationship. Caroline Adderson is the author of four novels (A History of Forgetting, Sitting Practice, The Sky Is Falling, Ellen in Pieces), two collections of short stories (Bad Imaginings, Pleased to Meet You), and many books for young readers. Her work has received numerous prize nominations including the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, two Commonwealth Writers’ Prizes, the Scotiabank Giller Prize longlist, the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Rogers’ Trust Fiction Prize. Winner of two Ethel Wilson Fiction Prizes and three CBC Literary Awards, Caroline was also the recipient of the 2006 Marian Engel Award for mid-career achievement. She lives in Vancouver where she teaches in SFU’s Writing and Publishing Program.

Freelance Editing 101 with Barbara Adamski Thinking of taking the plunge into full- or part-time freelance editing? Learn what to consider before setting up shop, how to find and keep good clients, and the benefits, pitfalls, and not-so-fun (yet necessary!) aspects of freelancing. At the end of this workshop, participants will better understand whether a career in freelance editing is for them; learn what to do before taking the plunge; discover how to find their niche and market themselves for specific projects; understand how to set up and operate a successful freelance business; and identify some of the benefits and pitfalls of freelance editing. Barbara K. Adamski has been a freelance writer and editor for over a decade. Her recent editing projects include Salmonbellies vs. the World: The Story of Lacrosse’s Most Famous Team and Their Greatest Rivals, This Godforsaken Place, and several ebooks.

Stylistic Editing: Beyond the Basics with Nancy Flight Stylistic editing is editing to clarify meaning, improve flow, and smooth language. This workshop will go beyond the basics to focus on the more advanced aspects of stylistic editing. It will also explore such provocative topics as when omitting needless words can go too far and when repetition is good. Nancy Flight is associate publisher of Greystone Books. She has been editing books for more than forty years, both as an in-house editor and as a freelancer, in Canada and the United States. She has worked with such authors as David Suzuki, Evelyn Lau, and Wade Davis, among many others. She received the 1988 Tom Fairley Award for Editorial Excellence for her work on Genethics: The Art of Engineering Life, by David Suzuki and Peter Knudtson. In addition, she has taught at the SFU Masters of Publishing Program, the Banff Book Editing Workshop, the Simon Fraser University Book Editing Workshop, and the SFU Book Publishing Workshop and has taught writing at SFU. Nancy is also a past president of Editors Canada and of the Association of Book Publishers of British Columbia and has served on the executive council of the Association of Canadian Book Publishers. She was responsible for revising the standards for stylistic editing during Editors Canada’s review of professional standards in 2009. She currently sits on the Langara College Publishing Advisory Committee.

Creating Compelling Web Content with Lisa Manfield
September 26, 2015—As Web readers become more and more difficult to attract—and keep—on your website, how can today’s Web editors ensure that their digital content engages online audiences? Effective web editing comes down to three key strategies—understanding web readers, knowing enough about search optimization to ensure copy is found, and making the most of social media sharing. Lisa Manfield is a writer, editor, and content strategist. She has developed print and online content, marketing collateral, and courseware for small businesses, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and educational institutions. Currently a digital writer at tech startup Chimp, she has also been the editor of BCLiving.ca, managing editor at Orato.com, and marketing manager at TheTyee.ca. She also teaches Writing and Editing for the Web at Simon Fraser University.

Past Seminars 2014–2015

Getting the Message Across: Clear Writing Tips
March 19, 2015—Workplace documents have one goal: to deliver a message quickly and clearly to a particular audience. But too often that message gets buried by weak organization, wordiness, abstract language, jargon, unhelpful design, and other barriers to readability. This half-day introduction to clear writing shows you how to remove those barriers and build a document that says what it means. We’ll talk about the all-important reader, including the different types of readers and their varying needs. We’ll cover seven practical techniques for making written documents clearer. We’ll finish with a look at how page layout affects readability. The workshop includes short exercises to help you apply what you learn. You’ll also receive a list of recommended resources. Frances Peck (West Coast Editorial Associates) is a writer and Honorary Certified Professional Editor who specializes in editing and rewriting for clarity. She has taught for the University of Ottawa, Simon Fraser University, Douglas College, the Editors’ Association of Canada, and countless government and private sector organizations. Frances is the author of Peck’s English Pointers, a collection of articles and quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada, and a co-author of the HyperGrammar website.

PubPro 2015: An Unconference for Managing Editors and Publication Production Specialists Co-hosts: EAC-BC, SFU Publishing Workshops of the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing
April 25, 2015—Whether you’re called managing editor, production editor, editorial coordinator, publications director, project manager, editor-in-chief, or any number of titles, you do any or all of the following:

  • Work in-house for an organization that creates publications
  • Manage an editorial and production team of in-house staff and freelancers
  • Hire freelancers, including editors, writers, designers, and indexers
  • Develop project schedules
  • Create or work to project budgets
  • Shepherd projects through the production process

Publishers often meet to discuss sales, marketing, and digital strategies, but rarely do the people who actually make the publications happen get together and brain-share. This special PD event is a series of short seminars, offering managing editors and production specialists the opportunity to meet others in similar roles and learn from one another. Whether you’re interested in how others approach freelancer recruitment, training, and scheduling, or have a success story to share about streamlining workflow or project management, PubPro is the place to air your production-related questions and triumphs.

Eight-Step Editing with Jim Taylor
February 21, 2015—Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned editor, a would-be writer or a supervisor of others’ writing, this course will help you make your words work better. Using a step-by-step process, the program identifies the most common factors that become obstacles for readers. It not only helps recognize the problems, it shows quick and simple techniques for fixing them. Professional editors tend to make these corrections intuitively. Eight-Step Editing helps them ensure they haven’t overlooked some crucial readability factor in their zeal to track down spelling or punctuation inconsistencies. Novice editors often suffer from paralysis. Eight-Step Editing gives them a starting point that doesn’t depend on subjective assessments of a manuscript’s worth. Freelance writers can use the Eight-Step process to improve their own materials before submission, enhancing their chances of acceptance. Business writers, trapped in traditional formulas from the filing cabinet, will benefit from a fresh vision for writing prose that can persuade and motivate. At the same time, supervisors and administrators who approve letters and reports will understand better what to look for. Jim Taylor developed Eight-Step Editing as a workshop for the Editors’ Association of Canada in 1985. He has led Eight-Step workshops in Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver, Halifax, Montreal, Edmonton, Calgary, and Victoria. A graduate of the University of British Columbia, Jim Taylor has over 50 years’ experience in writing and editing. He has produced programs in both private and public radio; he was for 13 years managing editor of a 300,000 circulation national magazine; he has also been editor of two other magazines and seven newsletters. In 1981, he co-founded a publishing house, Wood Lake Books Inc., which has since published over 200 titles. He is himself the author of 17 books, and has had “somewhere over 800” periodical articles published. He writes two newspaper columns a week (also available on the Internet). He regularly teaches writing and editing workshops all across Canada.

Building a Successful Editing Business with Peter Moskos
January 24, 2015—For many editors, working as an individual freelancer or in-house editor is just the ticket. For others, the idea of growing an editing business holds strong appeal. Using a series of discussion scenarios, we’ll start the workshop by looking at how you run and handle work overload in a single-person business. We’ll then explore possible expansions from a simple partnership to an incorporated company with employees. As part of our journey, we’ll stop to learn how to estimate costs for an editing project and how to prepare a proposal for editing work. These are abilities every freelance editor needs. We’ll also consider what’s wrong when you are doing more work but taking home less money. Whatever your business goal, you’ll find strategies for making your editing business succeed and moulding it to a lifestyle that suits you. From 1995 to 2004, Peter Moskos was the managing partner and cofounder of the Gordon Writing Group. He oversaw the company’s growth from a small two-person operation to Ottawa’s largest and best-known provider of writing and editing services. During this time, Peter learned much about making a writing and editing business successful. Now based in Vancouver, Peter has taught business skills in the Print Futures Professional Writing Program at Douglas College and offered an online course on government reports for Ryerson University’s Certificate in Publishing. Peter is an EAC Honorary Certified Professional Editor and often works on developing the tests used in EAC’s certification program.

Beyond Track Changes: Editing with Microsoft Word
November 29, 2014—Love it or hate it, Microsoft Word is the de facto tool of the trade for editors. Are you getting the most out of it? In this full-day seminar, learn how to:

  • tame Word’s most irritating automatic features and customize your settings to maximize editing efficiency
  • effortlessly navigate through a Word document
  • use Word’s built-in shortcut keys—beyond copy and paste—and create some of your own
  • use Word’s revision tools (including Track Changes and comments) effectively
  • perform powerful searches, enabling you to, for example, select the acronyms in a document and format them at once, find out the number of times a word is used, and quickly format numbers according to your style sheet
  • use Styles—not only for quick formatting but also for structural editing and restricting Find and Replace to certain parts of your document
  • create helpful AutoCorrect, AutoText, and macro shortcuts to save you keystrokes

These techniques help transform Word from a simple word processor into a powerful editorial ally. This seminar applies to versions of Microsoft Word 2007 and later (PC and Mac). Participants should bring Microsoft Word–installed laptops. Iva Cheung is a Certified Professional Editor with a dozen years’ experience editing books, journals, books, magazines, and websites. She co-taught On-Screen Editing: Getting the Most Out of Microsoft Word with Grace Yaginuma in SFU’s Writing and Communications program. She holds a Master of Publishing degree from SFU and is a winner of the Tom Fairley Award for Editorial Excellence. Grace Yaginuma is a Certified Copy Editor who has been editing full time since 2005. After completing the editing and publishing certificates at SFU continuing studies, she worked in house at Self-Counsel Press and Whitecap Books. She now freelance edits, specializing in non-fiction and cookbook editing. Ann-Marie Metten is a Certified Professional Editor who works in-house at Talonbooks wrestling with both the Mac and PC versions of Microsoft Word to publish plays, poetry, and Quebec literature in translation. As an editor whose career editing books and magazines began in 1982, she has edited with every version of Word, from the clumsy MS-DOS version released as Word 1.0 in October 1983 right through to the much more flexible tool it is today.

Advanced Proofreading with Ruth Wilson
September 20, 2014—This exercise-based workshop focuses on beyond-the-basics proofreading skills. It offers participants the opportunity to examine excerpts from complex documents and learn how to fine-tune their proofreading eye to catch every error. With documents ranging from recipes to journal articles, participants will be challenged to use their judgment to weigh the pros and cons of making changes, querying authors, or making no changes at all. Time will be spent discussing the process a proofreader must follow as part of a larger production team, and examples of process checklists from publishers and organizations will be provided. This workshop will be helpful to anyone wishing to advance their proofreading skills, prepare for job advancement, or study for EAC’s upcoming Proofreading Certification test this fall. Participants should have some proofreading experience and be familiar with conventional mark-up. Course material will be supplied, but participants should bring a current dictionary, pencils and pens, a calculator, and a ruler or other measure that they now use on the job. Ruth Wilson has more than 30 years’ experience editing and proofreading trade books, professional journals, association publications, and corporate materials. She worked for many years with Vancouver book publisher Self-Counsel Press, and since 1998 she has been an independent consultant and partner in West Coast Editorial Associates. Ruth is also a respected instructor in the Writing and Communications Program and the Summer Publishing Workshops at Simon Fraser University, where she teaches proofreading, editing, and plain language skills. She has also served on several national committees of the Editors’ Association of Canada (EAC). In 2014 she was granted an honorary Certified Professional Editor (CPE) in recognition of her contributions to EAC’s professional certification program.

Past Seminars 2013–2014

PubPro 2014: An Unconference for Managing Editors and Publication Production Specialists
May 24, 2014—Publishers often meet to discuss sales, marketing, and digital strategies, but very rarely do the people who actually make the publications happen get to gather and brain share. This special PD seminar offers managing editors and production specialists the opportunity to meet others in their role and learn from one another.

Usage Woes and Myths with Frances Peck
April 12, 2014—You’ve sorted out imply and infer. You know it’s not all right to use alright. But what about more troublesome usage points, like the difference between may and might? Or such commonly misused words as dilemma and fulsome? Is it true that you should always change though to although, till to until? Is impact now officially a verb? For anyone intent on preventing (not avoiding) word errors and avoiding (not preventing) usage myths, this seminar will help. We’ll take an up-to-date look at some of the most misunderstood and contentious points of English usage, and identify helpful guides and other resources. Bring your top usage questions to share with the group. Frances Peck has been an editor and writer for over 20 years. Author of Peck’s English Pointers and a co-author of the HyperGrammar website, she teaches editing at Douglas College and Simon Fraser University and gives workshops across Canada. She is a partner with West Coast Editorial Associates and a member of the EAC-BC executive.

Structural + Stylistic = Substantive Editing with Yvonne Van Ruskenveld
March 29, 2014—Substantive editing brings order to chaos and breathes life into moribund manuscripts. By reorganizing and revising, you can help authors reach their readers effectively. But facing a disorganized, incomplete (or overstuffed!) manuscript can be daunting. This workshop will discuss techniques for assessing non-fiction manuscripts, identifying problem areas, creating solutions, working with the author, and estimating. Whether you edit newsletter articles or full-length books, the strategies and techniques in this workshop can enhance your substantive editing skills. Yvonne Van Ruskenveld is an experienced editor and writer who enjoys transforming sprawling, jumbled manuscripts into interesting, readable publications. Yvonne has worked both as a freelancer and as managing editor for an educational publisher. Her clients have included publishers large and small, other businesses, governments, a commission of inquiry, non-governmental organizations, and academics. She has worked on manuals, reports, brochures, websites, trade books, and textbooks. Yvonne lives in Victoria and is a member of West Coast Editorial Associates.

Research Skills and Fact Checking
February 8, 2014
Introduction to Research Skills with Susan Safyan. In this short session, you’ll be given an introduction to research skills and free online reference resources. By the end of the workshop, you’ll know how to assess the reliability of the information found on a website (when can you trust Wikipedia?) and effectively use both search engines like Google and databases such as CBCA. Plus, you’ll be given a list of librarian-approved online reference sources to use for fact checking. Susan Safyan, MLIS, was an academic reference librarian for a dozen years before switching over to the other side of the book biz. She’s the editor at Vancouver’s Arsenal Pulp Press and bibliographer for BC Studies: The British Columbia Quarterly.
Fact Checking for Editors with Mary Schendlinger. Editors and publishers are major contributors to the public record, so we’d better get things right! In this workshop, through discussion and hands-on exercises, we will survey the pleasures and challenges of checking facts in print and online material. Why to check, what to check, where to check, how to assess the authority of a source, how to ask questions, how to present results to writers and publishers, how to document the work—and how to do a good job when the budget doesn’t allow for a thorough check. Mary Schendlinger has worked as a writer, editor, and publisher for 43 years. She is senior editor of Geist magazine, a member of the SFU Master of Publishing faculty, and an instructor in the UBC Creative Writing Program.

Eight-Step Editing with Jim Taylor
January 18, 2014—Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned editor, a would-be writer or a supervisor of others’ writing, this course will help you make your words work better. Using a step-by-step process, the program identifies the most common factors that become obstacles for readers. It not only helps recognize the problems, it shows quick and simple techniques for fixing them. Professional editors tend to make these corrections intuitively. Eight-Step Editing helps them ensure they haven’t overlooked some crucial readability factor in their zeal to track down spelling or punctuation inconsistencies. Novice editors often suffer from paralysis. Eight-Step Editing gives them a starting point that doesn’t depend on subjective assessments of a manuscript’s worth. Freelance writers can use the Eight-Step process to improve their own materials before submission, enhancing their chances of acceptance. Business writers, trapped in traditional formulas from the filing cabinet, will benefit from a fresh vision for writing prose that can persuade and motivate. At the same time, supervisors and administrators who approve letters and reports will understand better what to look for. Jim Taylor developed Eight-Step Editing as a workshop for the Editors’ Association of Canada in 1985. He has led Eight-Step workshops in Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver, Halifax, Montreal, Edmonton, Calgary, and Victoria. A graduate of the University of British Columbia, Jim Taylor has over 50 years’ experience in writing and editing. He has produced programs in both private and public radio; he was for 13 years managing editor of a 300,000 circulation national magazine; he has also been editor of two other magazines and seven newsletters. In 1981, he co-founded a publishing house, Wood Lake Books Inc., which has since published over 200 titles. He is himself the author of 17 books, and has had “somewhere over 800” periodical articles published. He writes two newspaper columns a week (also available on the Internet). He regularly teaches writing and editing workshops all across Canada.

Effective Writing for the Web with Zoe Grams
November 30, 2013—Effective web engagement requires writers to create strong first impressions while also developing an ongoing relationship with readers. As such, writing—and editing—for the web is often vastly different to its in-print counterparts. In this course you will discover how readers interact with online content and what to consider when crafting writing to connect with such an audience. Through practical exercises, open dialogue, and leading techniques, this course will help you to optimize writing across different online platforms. Zoe Grams is a communications specialist who has worked with a range of not-for-profits, authors, and publishers on both sides of the Atlantic.

Beyond the Basics: Advanced Copy Editing with Maureen Nicholson
October 19, 2013—You know language; you’re a master of style and syntax; you can spot a typo or a format glitch from metres away. What more can you do to improve the language you work with? This workshop deals with advanced copy editing: What is it? How do you do it? What are its best practices? What are the best resources? How do you schedule it? What can you charge for it? Participants who will benefit most from this all-day workshop will be competent copy editors with successful experience editing in different publication formats. They may also be preparing to write the November 2013 EAC Certification Copy Editing Test. The workshop will require preparation and active participation throughout the day. Come prepared to share your skills and experiences. Maureen Nicholson has 30 years’ experience as an editor. She coordinates and teaches in the professional writing program at Douglas College, is a past-president and honorary life member of the Editors’ Association of Canada, and now, for the most part, edits books.

Grammar Essentials for Writers and Editors: A Seminar for the Faint-hearted and the Fearless with Barbara Tomlin
September 21, 2013—Whether you feel anxious when you hear the word “grammar” or you are eager to address gaps in your knowledge, you will benefit from this review of how English works—and sometimes doesn’t. Can you explain how a transitive verb differs from an intransitive one, or how a phrase differs from a clause? Can you tell a client or your colleagues what is wrong with a sentence that “doesn’t sound right”? Many capable writers and editors of English would have to answer no to these questions. Through exercises, discussions and group activities, gain a better understanding of sentence structure and grammar terminology. Learn about common errors that can mar otherwise good writing, and leave the seminar feeling better about your grasp of the language that you use by instinct every day. Barbara Tomlin began working in the publishing industry more than 30 years ago, first for educational and trade book publishers, and then for magazine publishers. Since then she has edited, copy edited, and proofread a wide range of material for a variety of clients. She is certified as an Editor in the Life Sciences and is a past chair of the Editors’ Association of Canada Certification Steering Committee. She has also been an instructor for SFU’s Writing and Communications Program for more than 20 years and has developed writing and editing workshops for many organizations. She is a founding member of West Coast Editorial Associates.

Past Seminars 2012–2013

PubPro 2013: An Unconference for Managing Editors and Publication Production Specialists
April 13, 2013—Publishers often meet to discuss sales, marketing, and digital strategies, but very rarely do the people who actually make the publications happen get to gather and brain share. This special PD seminar offers managing editors and production specialists the opportunity to meet others in their role and learn from one another.

Grammar Boot Camp with Frances Peck
April 7, 2013—Want to flex your grammar (and punctuation and usage) muscles? This intensive seminar will put you through the paces. Focusing on high-level errors—the ones that make it past editors and proofreaders and into print—this one-day session will help you identify and fix the most puzzling mistakes in grammar, punctuation, and usage. We’ll look at errors from a range of publications, discuss up-to-date approaches to correcting them, and run through a series of challenging editing exercises. Feel free to bring along any difficult examples you’ve encountered on the job. Frances Peck has been working with words for over two decades, whether writing them, editing them, or teaching people about them. Author of Peck’s English Pointers (available through the Language Portal of Canada) and a co-author of the popular HyperGrammar website, she teaches editing at Douglas College and Simon Fraser University. She is a partner with West Coast Editorial Associates and a member of the EAC-BC executive.

Ethics for Editors with Mary Schendlinger
March 16, 2013—To edit and publish language is to mediate knowledge and culture—quite the responsibility! We will explore ethical questions for editors, from the gravity-defying act of juggling the needs of writers, advertisers, and readers, to the sensitive diplomatic mission of pointing out a racist or sexist passage, to the daredevil feat of deciding just how creative a piece of creative non-fiction can be. By working through exercises and sharing experiences, we will find new entrances to the questions and new ideas for solutions. Mary Schendlinger has worked as a writer, editor, and publisher for 42 years. She is senior editor of Geist magazine, a member of the SFU Master of Publishing faculty, and an instructor in the UBC Creative Writing Program.

Freelance 101 for Editors: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly with Barbara K. Adamski
February 23, 2013—Whether you’re thinking of taking the plunge into full- or part-time freelancing or are already doing it, this workshop is for you. Learn what to consider before setting up shop, how to find and keep good clients, and some of the common pitfalls and not-so-fun (yet necessary!) aspects of freelancing.
Barbara K. Adamski has been a freelance writer and editor for the better part of a decade. Her recent editing projects include a book on video game law, several novels, and the bestselling ebook Finding Karla.

Editing Fiction with Caroline Adderson
January 12, 2013—Behind every great novelist and short story writer there is a great editor. In this course, acclaimed author and writing teacher Caroline Adderson will share techniques to help editors bring out the greatness in their writers, from dazzling openings to moving endings, and the whole story in between, including effective plotting, pacing, and dialogue. She will also offer advice on the all-important writer-editor relationship. www.carolineadderson.com www.carolineaddersonkids.com

Grammar Essentials for Writers and Editors: A Seminar for the Faint-hearted and the Fearless with Barbara Tomlin
November 18, 2012—Our first seminar in Kelowna. Whether you feel anxious when you hear the word “grammar” or you are eager to address gaps in your knowledge, you will benefit from this review of how English works—and sometimes doesn’t. Through exercises, discussions, and group activities, gain a better understanding of sentence structure and grammar terminology. Learn about common errors that can mar otherwise good writing, and leave the seminar feeling better about your grasp of the language that you use by instinct every day.

Structural + Stylistic = Substantive Editing with Yvonne Van Ruskenveld
October 27, 2012—Substantive editing brings order to chaos and breathes life into moribund manuscripts. By reorganizing and revising, you can help authors reach their readers effectively. But facing a disorganized, incomplete (or overstuffed!) manuscript can be daunting. This workshop will discuss techniques for assessing non-fiction manuscripts, identifying problem areas, creating solutions, and working with the author. Whether you edit newsletter articles or full-length books, the strategies and techniques in this workshop can enhance your substantive editing skills. 

Advanced Proofreading with Ruth Wilson
September 22, 2012—This exercise-based seminar focuses on beyond-the-basics proofreading skills. It offers you the opportunity to examine excerpts from complex documents and learn how to fine-tune your proofreading eye to catch every error. Using documents ranging from maps to menus, catalogue pages to journal pages, instructor Ruth Wilson will challenge you to use your judgment to weigh the pros and cons of making changes, querying authors, or making no changes at all.

Past Seminars 2011–2012

Editing for Style: Beyond the Basics with Maureen Nicholson 
May 5, 2012—When you edit for style, what are you expected to do? How does this kind of edit differ from proofreading or copy editing?
If there are no hard and fast rules to guide an edit, how do you proceed? In this workshop, you will learn a set of principles to guide your approach to editing for style. The workshop includes an overview of stylistic editing, a conceptual framework for this type of editing, and practice in applying stylistic editing techniques. You will work with sample documents provided in advance as well as with material presented in the workshop. The focus of the workshop is on improving document clarity, flow, and language, as well as effectively communicating stylistic editing choices to an author or project team.

Picture Research with Mary Rose MacLachlan and Derek Capitaine (MRM Associates)
April 21, 2012—This seminar includes: Introduction to Picture Research, copyright basics, sources, keywords and other search tips, Lightboxes, submitting to clients, ordering high resolution images and image quality for reproduction, tools of the trade, licensing assets, vendor agreements, types of licensing (RM, RF, Public Domain, etc.), preparing credits, project management (the importance of creating and maintaining photo logs), question and answer sessions. Picture research projects at MRM Associates cover a wide range of subjects from the arts to science to business to social studies. Mary Rose began her career in-house at Prentice-Hall Canada, then moved to Penguin Books selling the subsidiary rights for the Canadian list and then to Harcourt as permissions editor before going freelance. Derek joined MRM Associates as a partner in 2010. He brings his love of photography and his database expertise to the company.

Advanced Proofreading with Ruth Wilson
March 24, 2012—This exercise-based seminar focuses on beyond-the-basics proofreading skills. It offers you the opportunity to examine excerpts from complex documents and learn how to fine-tune your proofreading eye to catch every error. Using documents ranging from maps to menus, catalogue pages to journal pages, instructor Ruth Wilson will challenge you to use your judgment to weigh the pros and cons of making changes, querying authors, or making no changes at all. Time will be spent discussing the process a proofreader must follow when part of a larger production team, and examples of process checklists from various publishers and organizations will be provided.

Structural + Stylistic = Substantive Editing with Yvonne Van Ruskenveld
March 17, 2012 in Victoria, BC—Substantive editing brings order to chaos and breathes life into moribund manuscripts. This workshop will discuss techniques for assessing non-fiction manuscripts, identifying problem areas, creating solutions, and working with the author. Whether you edit newsletter articles or full-length books, the strategies and techniques in this workshop can enhance your substantive editing skills.

Plain Language: The Basics with Peter Moskos
February 18, 2012—Clear communication is key to good writing. This course will introduce you to the fundamentals of plain language, and teach you how to apply it to your own work. Course materials include “before” and “after” writing samples, explanations of the 12 plain language techniques, and an easy-to-use checklist.

Eight-Step Editing with Jim Taylor
January 21, 2012—Using a step-by-step process, the program identifies the most common factors that become obstacles for readers. It not only helps recognize the problems, it shows quick and simple techniques for fixing them. Eight-Step Editing helps professional editors ensure they haven’t overlooked some crucial readability factor in their zeal to track down spelling or punctuation inconsistencies, and gives novice editors a starting point that doesn’t depend on subjective assessments of a manuscript’s worth.

The Secrets of Syntax with Frances Peck
October 8, 2011—This seminar looks at syntax from various angles, including how to shape it for different documents and readers. Topics covered include subordination and coordination, periodic versus cumulative sentences, proximity of subject and verb, echo words, and special techniques such as ellipsis and isolation.

Writing and Editing for the Web with Lisa Manfield
September 10, 2011—This course will introduce you to a range of skills needed by interactive writers and editors, including content research and development, search engine optimization, adapting print materials for the web, and understanding Web 2.0. 

Past Seminars 2010–2011

Always Pity the Poor Reader: Copy Editing 101 with Rob Dykstra
May 14, 2011—This workshop will provide participants with an overview of the copy editing function, the process, and a hands-on editing experience involving common problems, errors and pitfalls. It is designed for those who want to embark on a copy editing career, or as a refresher for those who have limited experience in the field. 

Grammar Fundamentals with Frances Peck
March 12, 2011—Whether your aim is to plug educational holes, to better apply the rules of grammar, or to impress your clients and colleagues, this seminar will cover all the grammatical terms and structures you need to know. So bring your pencils and prepare to parse.

Edting Narrative with Mary Schendlinger
February 12, 2011—Participants will learn tips and techniques for evaluating a narrative—the big picture and the small picture—and for working effectively with the writer as she goes back in to fix it.

What’s the Real Job of a Technical Editor? with Jason Hall
November 27, 2010—If the job of the technical editor is to make complex subjects accessible to normal people, why is it that so many technical documents fail? What is the real job of a technical editor?

Start Your Own Editing Business with Cerina Wheatland
October 23, 2010—Come to this seminar and learn how to survive and thrive as a small business in the writing and editing industry.

Creating & Editing Social Content with the Book Broads
September 25, 2010—Shift happens. Shifts in media can mean fewer opportunities for editors. It is a known fact that there are fewer traditionally published books, newspapers are publishing less and less content, and magazines are also changing. The question is, when the shift hits the fan . . . where are the new opportunities for street-smart editors? The answer is technology. 


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