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Sessions

Sessions: Quick Reference

Navigating 40 years

  • Is editing a profession yet?

Navigating our story

  • Distressing content and trauma resiliency
  • Mi’kmaq culture – A balance of past and present
  • “Suas i!”: Publishing books in and about Gaelic in Nova Scotia

Navigating our markets

  • Be bold! Making your own opportunities
  • Winning contracts with the government of Canada
  • Navigating funding proposals: Editors adding value
  • Speed mentoring

Navigating our business

  • How to find and work with the right mentor—A workshop for editors
  • Using business information to increase your profits
  • The Imperfect Editor: An Oxymoron?
  • GST/HST—Ask an Accountant!
  • Challenges of managing a translation process
  • Building and maintaining a successful in-house editorial team

Navigating language and diversity

  • Translating medicalese into everyday English
  • Using plain language principles to improve your editing practice

Navigating techniques and technologies

  • Antidote 10: What’s new?
  • Bad graphs: Editing graphs for readability, fairness, and impact
  • Smooth sailing through citations: Tips and techniques for copyeditors
  • Macros 201: The Shell Game
  • Once Upon an editor: Editing children’s picture books
  • Are you certifiable? Preparing for the Editors Canada certification exams

Navigating 40 years

Is editing a profession yet?

Presenters: Iva Cheung and Jeanne McKane

Can editors can be professionals? This surprisingly controversial topic has resurfaced in bursts over the 40-year history of Editors Canada. Join a guided discussion that explores:

  • how professions like medicine and accounting structure organizational activities
  • what steps editing organizations elsewhere are taking toward professionalization
  • how editing-adjacent groups—like translators, indexers, and designers—have advocated for their professional interests
  • whether editing has achieved professionalization—and, if not, whether Editors Canada should keep striving for it

 

Navigating our story

Distressing content and trauma resiliency

Presenters: Kyra Nabeta and Heather Saunders

As mental health becomes less stigmatized, more and more people are telling their stories to assist in the healing process. As an editor, how do you approach subjects that can be deeply disturbing, such as abuse, violence, death, and loss? In this seminar, we will define trauma and discuss normal physiological reactions, as well as learn how to navigate through disturbing material, communication techniques, and self-care in editing.

Mi’kmaq culture – A balance of past and present

Presenter: Theresa Meuse

Learn how the Mi’kmaq use their traditional teachings in today’s modern day. Along with sharing of the teachings, there will be a show and tell of intricate works created by Mi’kmaq crafters.

“Suas i!”: Publishing books in and about Gaelic in Nova Scotia

Presenter: Emily MacEwan

Scottish Gaelic was the third most commonly-spoken language in Canada at the time of Confederation.The first Gaelic book was published in Nova Scotia 180 years ago. Despite anglophone efforts to erase Gaels from history, Gaelic is still a living language and culture in Nova Scotia. Join Dr. McEwan and guests for a discussion about the challenges of publishing in and about Gaelic—stereotypes, representation, and economics—and how we’re making it work.

 

Navigating our markets

Be bold! Making your own opportunities

Presenter: Laura Poole

In this session, you'll learn how to identify and take advantage of opportunities to build your freelance business--and how to create your own opportunities. We will explore how direct, bold questions and offers can propel you into new career opportunities. This is specifically for people who may have reached a plateau in their business and would like to continue growing but aren't sure how to go about it. Learn how public speaking, writing, and more can lift your business to new levels! Don't wait for someone to hand you the keys to the kingdom--start making things happen yourself!

Winning contracts with the government of Canada

Presenter: Marion Soublière

The Government of Canada spends about $20 billion yearly on goods and services. Even sole proprietors can sell directly to the feds—no matter where they are in Canada or whether they offer bilingual services. This workshop offers tips on sales approaches, marketing, getting security clearance and more. You’ll also learn about a new e-commerce site that will let all levels of government in Canada, plus others, buy from federal lists of suppliers.

Navigating funding proposals: Editors adding value

Presenters: Cathy McPhalen, Rhonda Kronyk and Becka Barker

The need to write proposals for grant funding permeates the worlds of the arts, not-for-profit organizations, academic research, and even business. We’ll cover the topics you most want and need to know about, including: how editors can bring added value to proposal writers and support funding success, the expertise editors need to flourish in this market, and how this work can combine your career with your personal passions. Bring your questions to our round-table discussion of this challenging and rewarding editing niche.

Speed mentoring

Need editorial or career advice? Speed mentoring offers editors of all experience levels an opportunity for advice and feedback from someone who’s been there. Sign up for speed mentoring, an hour of 15-minute one-on-one consultations with some of Editors Canada’s most highly regarded editors. Reserve your spot at speedmentoring@editors.ca.

 

Navigating our business

How to find and work with the right mentor—A workshop for editors

Presenter: Virginia McGowan

Most freelance editors are solopreneurs, solo proprietors of a small editing business; as such they have a mindset, aspirations and attitudes, and business practices that differ from those of other entrepreneurs. Yet, as with all small-business owners, having a mentor is critical for their success. This session is designed to help the solopreneur editor find and work with the right mentor to build a healthy, mutually beneficial relationship.

Using business information to increase your profits

Presenter: Erin Brenner

Do I charge enough? How many more clients do I need to make the money I want? Your editing business has a black box of information that will help you answer these questions and more. In this session, you’ll learn how to decode your business’s black box and what to do with the information to earn more while maintaining your sanity. And the math isn’t hard!

The Imperfect Editor: An Oxymoron?

Presenter: Sue MacLeod

This session explores “editorial anxiety”—the mental cost of the perfectionism that editing demands. We’ll look at ways to decrease errors in our work (e.g., when not to hit SEND; how Comments boxes can save the day). But we’ll also talk about putting limits on perfectionism, and how to live with it when we do make mistakes. A session for anyone who wants to be a great editor—and a sane one.

GST/HST—Ask an Accountant!

Presenters: Michelle Waitzman and Lori Messenger

Charging, collecting and remitting sales taxes is just another administrative nightmare for many self-employed editors. In this session, a freelance editor and a tax professional will tell you what you need to know about registering to collect GST/HST, which clients you need to bill for which taxes, what you need to pay and when, and how to pay as little as possible. Get your question ready!

Challenges of managing a translation process

Presenter: Alana Chalmers

If you edit in Canada, there’s a fair chance that the next stop after editing is translation. This session will look at what it’s like to manage the translation process, how to build a good relationship with your translator or agency, and some considerations when editing for translation (and maybe some bonus #TranslationFail).

Building and maintaining a successful in-house editorial team

Presenter: Christine Beevis Trickett

This interactive session will discuss the evolution of the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s editorial services team; the challenges in convincing a science-based organization to adopt a style guide, plain language and storytelling culture; the services offered by the editorial team; our integration with the French services and translation team; and the benefits of staffing an in-house editorial services team. Participants will have the opportunity to share their struggles and successes.

 

Navigating language and diversity

Translating medicalese into everyday English

Presenter: James Harbeck

Doctors, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals use wordings designed to say “This is medical!” Some of it increases accuracy for those with the necessary background, but much of it keeps non-professionals from understanding it. And articles on medical information in news and other media often skew or misrepresent data. Find out how to help ordinary people understand medical information accurately and effectively.

Using plain language principles to improve your editing practice

Presenter: Nicole Watkins Campbell

This one-hour workshop will introduce editors to using plain language to improve non-fiction documents intended for specific adult audiences, like people with no technical background who need technical information (people with wills, for example). The session will introduce how to assess audience information needs, review top techniques to make documents more readable (with reference to EC substantive and stylistic editing standards), and opportunity for participants to practise their new skills. 

 

Navigating techniques and technologies

Antidote 10: What’s new?

Presenter: Louise Saint-André

A new version of Antidote was launched in November 2018. Come discover its exciting new features, including its translation component, readability indices, synonym-sorting capacity, and gender-neutrality filter. It may even help shorten your tweets!

Bad graphs: Editing graphs for readability, fairness, and impact

Presenter: Robin Marwick

A good graph or chart is readable, accurate, and fair—and it tells a compelling story in support of the text around it. Editors who can recognize the elements of a good graph, analyze a bad graph, and propose improvements that turn a bad graph into a good one are in a strong position to provide more value to their clients. This hands-on session will help you learn to tackle graphs with confidence.

Smooth sailing through citations: Tips and techniques for copyeditors

Presenter: Leslie Saffrey

For copyeditors of non-fiction, dealing with source citations can be daunting. In this session, learn how to break the task into manageable chunks and discover ways to make it easier. We’ll look at identifying major citation styles, applying a style, converting from one style to another, styling in-text citations and checking them against a reference list, editing footnotes and endnotes, and editing reference lists and bibliographies.

Macros 201: The Shell Game

Presenter: Amy J. Schneider

Editors familiar with macro basics will learn how to “power up” their macros with “shells” that automate processes even more. Attendees will learn to (1) run a macro through an entire document, (2) automate turning off tracking as needed, and (3) set up a dialog box to access and categorize their favorite macros. Attendees should be familiar with creating and editing macros, using the Visual Basic Editor, and creating keyboard shortcuts in Word.

Once Upon an editor: Editing children’s picture books

Presenter: Whitney Moran

In this session, Nimbus Publishing’s managing editor and in-house children’s book editor, Whitney Moran, draws from experience working with some of Canada’s most celebrated authors to introduce the process behind children’s picture book editing. Through case studies of real projects, attendees will learn the process behind a successful children’s picture book, from acquisition and manuscript development, to art direction and production, to the final product.

Are you certifiable? Preparing for the Editors Canada certification exams

Presenter: Jess Shulman

Learn everything you ever wanted to know about the Editors Canada certification exams from a certified professional editor and co-chair of the Editors Canada Certification Steering Committee, who will provide valuable tips on how to prepare for the exams. You’ll also have the chance to test your mettle with sample questions and discuss your answers with other editors